8 Offering / MULUC – Favorite Birds of the Pacific Northwest

THE TRECENA WIND/IK

MAYAN CALENDAR DAYKEEPER’S JOURNAL

Greetings Kin,

The birds were my first love when I moved to Washington. I loved how the gulls swooped down to grab french fries out of my hand, riding on the top deck of the ferry. Those born here saw them more like flying rats.

The birds were God’s salvation for me. Emerging from my darkness, all I had to do was look out my window to see Love between living things in the birds that came every day. It was good for a couple of years, before neighbors complained. By then, it was practically an aviary of a few generations.

This is my offering of Gratitude for the Beauty and Love and Life on Mother Earth. God designed the possibilities for human to know beauty such as this.

Northern Flicker
I Love this guy. It’s a heftier bird and the feathers always look like a formal outfit – very dignified and sweet. You can’t see until it takes off that the entire underside of the wings is bright orange – like a flash of fire. There were at least couple of visits from the Northern Flickers each day. They hang around the suet.

 

Stellar’s Jay is among the most beautiful and interesting characters. My first experience with them was that they didn’t like to be seen. They have a distinctive call. I could never appear in a window before they would fly off – even with very devious strategies. Though, putting out seed on my balcony – they always announced their arrival and let me watch. Just don’t try to take any pictures. Over a summer a pair came together, then later brought their whole family of 3 little ones. I felt like the family picnic destination the kid’s needed to know about. (Never mind if I’m screwing up a natural order. It was a gift from God that was a moment away every day.) The Stellar’s Jay is a totem kin to the Crow.

 

Chickadees

These are the sweetest little birds with a pleasant morning chorus. There are not so many songbirds in Washington as in the Midwest. They have a sweet way. One scout would always come first in the morning after I put out the seed. I had strategically placed terracotta saucers in nooks and crannies that provided cover. The scout would hop around to inspect each dish, then take one seed back to the nest. It never ate on the first visit – just coming to take the seed back, which must be “I know where breakfast is ready.” As tiny as they were, the bigger birds never minded if they competed for food. They are most beautiful in the winter. They become fuzzy little balls with their feathers puffed out. The ones near me were marked with beige/brown features and the black accents.

 

House Finch

These were very sweet birds that worked in close community with mother and father trading some roles. The mother hatches the eggs, then the dad clears out the shells and manages the babies from there. While the mother sat on her nest up in the rafters, Dad would claim the branch of a plant below to sing a morning chorus to the Sun. He was so invested in it.

There were at least two eggs to hatch on my balcony. I counted the days. At the very end, the whole extended family started hanging around for the imminent breakthroughs. They were still in their eggs on July 4th, when all the fireworks went off. I was as concerned as a mother hen and played them Brahms’s Lulluby as a comforting distraction. Their feathers can be rather dull, though when the red feathers catch the sun and you see the full beauty. I witnessed the mother teach them to eat. They looked bigger than she did with feathers puffed out. They would hunker and squawk for food and in between feeding, Mom would demonstrate how to hop over to the saucer of seeds and back again. They did it a couple of times, then went back to the begging routine. Mom was willing to feed them anyway. It was a 3 day lesson like that.

I had a special connection with these sweet ones. One day a little female flew in the opened sliding glass door and got hung up behind vertical blinds trying to find a way out of a nearest window. .I was able to capture her easily in my hand. It was a heart-pounding moment. She was so tiny and warm and I could feel the rapidly beating heart. Yet she totally fell still and silent in my hand – surely wondering the end. I would have loved to inspect her, but my first intention was to return her as soon as possible. I always wondered if she was one that built the nest in my rafters.

 

THANK YOU GOD FOR LIFE ON MOTHER EARTH, A GARDEN OF BEAUTY WHERE LIFE DEPENDS ON LOVE.

in lak’ech, i am another you

Debra, Jaguar Woman, 9 Eagle/MEN

THE TRECENA OF WIND/IK

8 Offering/MULUC (Cherokee, The River/YUN’WI GUNNAHI’TA)

Galactic Tone 8: Justice. Harmony and balance are the intent of Eight. Eights carefully weigh all evidence to reach a balance of justice. Eight is the power of organization demonstrated in the statement, “As above, so below”. From simplicity to infinity, the energy of Eight organizes all levels of creation. Some Eights are “Neat Freaks”.

Offering/MULUC: Also known as the sign of water. Ceremonially, Maya use water as an offering in baptisms and purifications. These ceremonies are done to bring about a collective strength, adaptability and harmony. In sincere appreciation, Offering people gladly give more than they ask for themselves. Offering persons are dynamic communicators with great intelligence making them excellent employers. Like a shaken vessel of water, Offering people regain equilibrium quickly. Also like a body of water, there may be deep undercurrents of emotion and hidden dangers. Others perceive these as hidden agendas in offering people and so extend them little trust and may even slap blame on them.

Cherokee, The River/YUN’WI GUNNAHI’TA:  The River is symbolized by The Milky Way, the Gihli’Utsun’stanun’yi “Where the Dog Ran” to gather the souls for Heaven.  The River is the minion for Grandfather Moon.  Long Man is the personification of the River stretching from the mountains to the lowlands, speaking to those who can understand.  People of this sign find “sermons in the stones” and good in everything.  These souls march to a different drummer, driven by inner volcanic forces.  The River is the “Fountain of Life” and represents the fluid of the cosmos to fluids in the body, with the energy to clear all karmic debts, personally and on a mass level with fluidity and grace.  The Moon controls our fluid cycle, to clear and understand emotional issues.  When you take this step to clear the emotional body, then you are ready for transformational energies at the next level.  As humans, our actions are ruled by our emotions, the key is to understand the connection and honor the emotions.

[Text in italics was the primary source of inspiration for my journal. These are the sources that started my journey and they are the reference for interpretation each day. By providing the original text, I hope to offer a way to see what inspired my thoughts and by including all the aspects – allow for something more to inspire you. Mayan descriptions are those written by Ian Lungold. Cherokee descriptions came from multiple sources. Links to sources and other resources of study are offered on the Daykeeper Resources Page. ~Debra]

2 thoughts on “8 Offering / MULUC – Favorite Birds of the Pacific Northwest

Comments are closed.